Christ Our Hope Orphanage

SJEDI & Christ Our Hope Orphanage Workshop

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 Overview

SJEDI Green Energy (SJEDI) has partnered with nonprofit One Body One Hope (OBOH) of Sioux Center, Iowa, on a sustainability and educational project in Liberia.  The board of OBOH, with the approval of the leadership at Christ Our Hope Orphanage (COH) in Monrovia, Liberia, agreed to partner with SJEDI to test and experiment with SJEDIs 60L Industrial Clean Cookstove.

About the Stove

SJEDI’s 60L Industrial, clean wood burning cookstove was created by Fed Colgan at Fred Colgan Island Works, a subsidiary
60L_smallof Aprovecho Research Center near Eugene, Oregon.  http://www.aprovecho.org/lab/home. The cookstove is designed for institutional use: schools, orphanages, and refugee or Individually Displaced Persons (IDP) camps.  The 60-liter pot can feed hundreds.  Its made of the highest quality materials and its close-tolerance construction guarantee long service and unparalleled performance.  The cookstove has 40% faster cooking times and over 60% fuel savings demonstrated in field testes, and over 75% fuel savings in laboratory tests.  The cookstove is clean and efficient, emitting over 85% less smoke and pollutants than open fire cooking.

Purpose

SJEDI wants to market this and similar stoves (see 100L version available late 2012: http://www.envirofit.org/files/Envirofit%20Product%20Overview2012.pdf) to school kitchens, restaurants, hospitals, barracks, refugee camps and other agencies that need to cook large quantities of food or for sterilizing medical equipment for instance.  SJEDI needs to compare the performance of the 60L to local cooking methods and sought out a local partner to help conduct the testing and is very thankful COH has taken up the challenge.  Hopefully, the cookstove will allow COH to provide meals for its students and staff at a tremendously reduced cost while increasing the health of the cooks and children who gather near where cooking takes place.

Data Collection

The students and staff at COH will cook with the Stove and run some basic experiments like measuring the amount of wood used to cook on a daily basis; conduct water-boil tests; determine the daily/weekly/monthly cost for using wood or charcoal; determine the efficiency of the cookstove using the data they collect; write recipes for traditional Liberian cuisine using the 60L stove. Additionally, the students and staff will attempt to make “green charcoal” from coconut husks, saw dust, sugar cane or rice or cornhusks and test the performance of the new charcoal briquettes in the new stove and determine its caloric value and efficiency.  SJEDI staff will be available to walk the students through these lessons and will solicit the help of Arizona State University’s School of Sustainability to help develop the lesson plans surrounding this project.

Educational Project

SJEDI will place the 60L stove in the kitchen of COH and have the students lead the effort to conduct the necessary testing and gather the required data.  The objective is to provide these great children with an educational opportunity to learn about: Indoor Air Pollution; the effects of cooking with wood and charcoal; how an efficient cookstove compares to the traditional “coal pot”; discuss efficiencies between wood, charcoal and the importance of caloric values; a discussion of how traditional charcoal is made and the environmental degradation caused by populations using the forest as their fuel source; a discussion on CO2, Methane, Black Carbon, and climate change science; a discussion how climate change affects women and children disproportionally and what they as future leaders can do about it; a discussion of complex issues such as the carbon market and the potential for Liberia to become a leader in this field.  There are many more lesson plans that can be created surrounding this project.

About Our Christ Our Hope Orphanage

COH is located at the Dumbar Farm suburb of Monrovia and is headed by Rev. Emmanuel Bimba and his wife Fatu. The orphanage is housed on the property of the church with one main dormitory, a church building, latrine, and one additional structure for meetings. The grounds are extremely rudimentary with no running water, utilities, phone lines or general civil infrastructure available.

Fatu-and-Emmanuel

Fatu Tests the 60L

Today, the orphanage runs on a lean budget of approximately $2,000 US per month donated by committed donors from the US. These meager funds support 56 orphans from 3 yrs. of age to 18; food, clothing, medical, shelter, and educational needs of the 56 orphans; basic living expenses for Emmanuel & Fatu who live on-site; salary for 8 full-time college-educated teachers who teach the children daily; cooking, cleaning, and security personnel; educational costs for an additional 75-100 community children who attend the school daily.

COHs facilities do not have a proper kitchen so cooking is done in a small section of the additional structure, which also functions as a storage facility.  COH cooks with 3 very inefficient “coal pots,” the local term for the cookstoves sold locally, usually cobbles together from old aluminum roofing and other spare metal parts.

 

These coal pots are obviously extremely inefficient, and very dirty; note the black soot covering the walls and floors of the kitchen area.  These Black Coal particulates enter the atmosphere and contribute directly to global warming, but more disturbingly, these particulates and other more harmful emissions enter the lungs of the women and children who gather near where this cooking occurs.

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Traditional cooking methods cannot achieve clean combustion so the majority of the heat is wasted and up to 20 percent of the biomass is converted into toxic substances like carbon monoxide, particulates, benzene and formaldehyde. Over 85% of IAP deaths are women and children under five, due to their increased exposure to IAP. Day in and out, and for hours at a time, women and their small children breath in amounts of smoke equivalent to consuming two packs of cigarettes per day. Where coal is used, additional contaminants such as sulfur, arsenic and fluorine may also be present in the air

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Caption: The 60L is lit; Our Christ Our Church Staff and Children Discuss the Project; Wood is gathered.

Workshop – February 2012, by Royston Gbelia, COO, SJEDI

The workshop at the orphanage when very well, we had go participation from the student and the cook. Rev. Emmanuel F. Bimba and his wife very involve doing the workshop. Rev Bimba said he started as a church in 2002 and in 2004 he added the orphanage and the school.

Rev Bimba selected three of the orphanage student to participate in the workshop, notwithstanding the rest of the student stood around observing.  There was no wood chip, therefore we used broken table and chairs from the school. It was chap in little pieces. The workshop was done at the back of the orphanage home.

We cook ten cups of rice for the study. Woods put in the stove at 10am Saturday 19, 2012. We use fire coal light the wood. At 10.05am twenty cups water was put into the pot. At 10:13am, the water started boiling and the rice was put into the pot. When the water started dry down, some of the firewood was taking out, to avoid the rice burning. At 10:35am the rice was ready for serving. At 10:38am the cook took the rice in the kitchen for serving.

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Caption: Christina Bimba, Evan Saah Sohoanen Havard Bimba, and Jennifer Karnwie lead the students in the cookstove testing.  Their observations can be seen at the end of this document

 

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The Small quantity of wood needed

Rev Bimba and wife said that from what they have experience from the wood cookstove is, fast and it use a lot less wood compared to when they used wood. He said even compare to coal pot, they will be saving because they spend about $200ld a day on coal. From what he experience, the little wood that was used to cook ten cups of rice, he and his wife hardly appreciated the stove.  This is the actual quantity of wood used to cook ten cup of rice. Thirty piece in total.

The orphanage have three cook, one of the cook is use to make the breakfast in the morning. However, for now they are using two because one of the cook quit and the oven that was used to bake the bread in the for the orphanage if broken and it will cost four hundred dollars to get an replacement. Therefore, for the past three month the student have not had breakfast.

According to Rev. Bimba, they buy their food supply wholesale, because food is very expenses. He said that they spent about $1,800 dollars a month on food along, because its very expenses to go to the market every day. Even with charcoal, for them to get a good deal, they will drive sometime two hours to get it at a wholesale price. He said that before we give them the commercial stove they was using one bag of charcoal every two day, and now it lasting a lot longer.  The Rev. Bimba and his wife are responsible for getting the food.  Bean, potato green, cassava leaf, and palm butter are regular on the menu.

About SJEDI Green Energy

SJEDIs is a Liberian company seeking to be the premier West African pro-poor, low-carbon development company, decreasing solid fuel use, improving health, the economy, and the environment.

CEO: Peter Gbelia, peter@sjedi.org, +1 (602) 538-2638

COO: Royston Gbelia, rgbelia@yahoo.com, +231-88-044-8542

www.sjedi.org

About One Body One Hope

When Pastor Aaron Baart and his wife Nicole met Rev. Robert Bimba in Ethiopia in December of 2006 while adopting their son, the two felt an immediate calling to partner together in ministry. This began the birth of One Body One Hope. Over the next 2 years, a multi-faceted partnership developed that focused on the orphanage and its growth, but also spilled over into other shared ministry endeavors.

The Board Members at One Body One Hope http://onebodyonehope.blogspot.com/

One Body One Hope

c/o The Baarts

589 13th St. Cir. SE

Sioux Center, Iowa 51250

(712) 722-4042

 About Christ Our Hope

Located in the Dumbar Farm suburb of Monrovia, headed by Rev. Emmanuel Bimba, another son of James. Emmanuel and his wife, Fatu, felt compelled along with their congregation at the end of the civil war to minister to the many orphaned children they found walking the streets of the city. This Spirit-led compulsion led to the founding of Christ Our Hope Orphanage. The orphanage is housed on the property of the church with one main dormitory, a church building, latrine, and one additional structure for meetings. The grounds are extremely rudimentary with no running water, utilities, phone lines or general civil infrastructure available. However, Emmanuel and Fatu have been incredibly committed, taking in 56 children without knowing how they might be able to meet all of their needs. Periodically, God brought individual donors along, and their church helps out where they can. Unfortunately, their pressing needs are ever-present and they prayed long and hard for committed long-term partners. Despite these incredible limitations, they have created a community of family, sacrifice, love, and renewal for these children.

The Current Situation: Today, the orphanage runs on a lean budget of approximately $2,000 US per month based on committed donors here in the US. These funds currently cover: Food, clothing, medical, shelter, and educational needs of 56 orphans; basic living expenses for Emmanuel & Fatu who live on-site; salary for 8 full-time college-educated teachers who teach the children daily; cooking, cleaning, and security personnel; educational costs for an additional 75-100 community children who attend the school daily.

The Growing Needs: Our current operational set-up has allowed us to dramatically increase the overall health, education, and safety of these children. However, our current 56 child sponsor families’ donations at $30 US per month are allowing us to “tread water” but not really get ahead. Yes, basic operational costs are being met; but children still sleep 3 to a bed, medical emergencies require additional fundraising, and much-needed capital projects have not yet been started.

Rev. Emmanuel Bimba, +231 675 7839, rev_bim@yahoo.com

Tim Bajema tmbajema@hotmail.com

About Abide in the Vine Fellowship

Abide in the Vine Fellowship is a network of four non-denominational church congregations throughout Liberia. They were all planted by Rev. James Bimba (now retired) and run through a collective leadership system, headed by Rev. Robert Bimba, James’ son. He pastors a congregation in Jacobtown, a suburb of the capital of Monrovia.

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